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Planet Earth 26: Icons of Glasgow


The Clyde Arc (known locally as the Squinty Bridge), is a road bridge spanning the River Clyde in Glasgow, in west central Scotland, connecting Finnieston, near the Clyde Auditorium and SECC with Pacific Quay and Glasgow Science Centre in Govan. A prominent feature of the bridge is its innovative curved design and the way that it crosses the river at an angle. The Arc is the first city centre traffic crossing over the river built since the Kingston Bridge was opened to traffic in 1969. The bridge was designed by the Halcrow Group and built by Kilsyth-based civil engineering company Edmund Nuttall. Glasgow City Council instigated the project in conjunction with Scottish Enterprise and the Scottish Executive. Piling works for the bridge were carried out from a large floating barge on the Clyde, whilst the bridge superstructure was fabricated offsite. The bridge-deck concrete-slab units were cast at an onsite pre-casting yard. Planning permission was granted in 2003 and construction of the bridge began in May 2005. It was structurally completed in April 2006.

The Botanic Gardens is known internationally for its impressive glass houses and extensive tropical and temperate plant collections from around the world. A variety of themes of horticultural and botanical interest are found in the grounds as well as attractive walks by the River Kelvin. Its immaculate formal gardens and arboretum provide a welcome break from the bustle of the West End. The Botanic Gardens are located at Kelvinside in Glasgow’s West End between the River Kelvin, Great Western Road and Queen Margaret Drive. The gardens can be accessed on foot from Great Western Road, Queen Margaret Drive, Kirklee Circus and from the Kelvin Walkway.

The Riverside Museum provides an exciting new home for Glasgow’s transport collection and replaces the Museum of Transport previousy located at the Kelvin Hall. The development has a riverside location on a site where the River Clyde meets Glasgow’s other main river, the Kelvin. The Riverside Museum project is funded by Glasgow City Council, with the Heritage Lottery Fund also a major sponsor. The much-acclaimed architect Zaha Hadid created the design for the Riverside Museum, which has already been dubbed ‘Glasgow’s Guggenheim’. The new museum houses collections not previously on display at the Museum of Transport, and for the first time allows the proper interpretation of Glasgow’s important maritime history. Visitors can walk down a re-created 1900s street, drive a locomotive and tackle a tenement fire. With more than 3,000 objects on display, from skateboards to locomotives, paintings to prams, velocipedes to voiturettes, there is something for visitors of all ages.

One of Scotland’s most iconic industrial structures is to become the second official venue in the country- for bungee jumping! The A-Listed Titan Crane on the River Clyde helped launch some of the most famous ships in the world in its heyday.

Glasgow Cathedral, also called the High Kirk of Glasgow or St Kentigern’s or St Mungo’s Cathedral, is today a gathering of the Church of Scotland in Glasgow. Technically, the building is no longer a cathedral, since it has not been the seat of a bishop since 1690. However, like other pre-Reformation cathedrals in Scotland, it is still a place of active Christian worship, hosting a Church of Scotland congregation.

The People’s Palace and Winter Gardens in Glasgow, Scotland is a museum and glasshouse situated in Glasgow Green, and was opened on 22 January, 1898 by the Earl of Rosebery. Originally, the ground floor of the building provided reading and recreation rooms, with a museum on the first floor, and a picture gallery on the top floor. Since the 1940s, it has been the museum of social history for the city of Glasgow, and tells the story of the people and the city from 1750 to the present day. The collections and displays reflect the changing face of the city and the different experiences of Glaswegians at home, work and leisure.





Another interesting icon of Glasgow is the Science Centre. Please click this link: here

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